Archive for Scarlet Tanager

The Pest Control folks are here

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 8, 2018 by lilybug1960

The Pest Control folks are here.
 
In our commitment to attracting wildlife and being better stewards to our land, we eliminated the use of pesticides and herbicides in the yard. Our plan brought in more insects, which in turn brought in the birds who eat them. The Scarlet Tanagers are regular visitors to the yard and the shrubs and trees. This one timed it perfect with the light striking the trees in the background creating an incredible backdrop for the beautiful bird. Between the Vireos, Tanagers and Warblers, they do a really good job of keeping the insects in check around the gardens.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 720, shutter speed of 1/125th of a second, Sirui P224S monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiImaging, #SiruiProfessional, #BirdNirdvana
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No doubt on this one

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 28, 2018 by lilybug1960

No doubt on this one.
 
I have recently posted two images of male Scarlet Tanagers that were in non-breeding colors, but this is what we all think of when we think of a Scarlet Tanager. Vivid red color with black wings. Yesterday was the first day that I was able to photograph a male in this plumage in the Crepe Myrtles. The beautiful greens contrasting with the reds of the bird, perfect in my eyes. I know one image that will definitely make the calendar this year! To think that simply not using pesticides and allowing the birds to pick the insects off the plants, that I could be less than 20 feet from this beautiful bird was exactly why we chose the route we did with our yard. Right now they are feasting on big green beetles. We had 3 Tanagers in the Crepe Myrtles at one point together yesterday.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 1100, shutter speed of 1/500th of a second, Sirui P224S monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sriui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiImaging, #SiruiProfessional, #BirdNirdvana

My Tanager Puzzle

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 27, 2018 by lilybug1960

My Tanager Puzzle.
 
So yesterday morning I photographed what I thought was a Scarlet Tanager male in non-breeding plumage. When I got it on the computer though I noticed on the wings there were 2 wing bars of yellow. Problem is, Scarlet Tanagers have only one! So I did a little research and found that a Western Tanager Female has 2 wing bars. This is so far east of the normal territory of Western Tanagers that I decided to send it out to some very knowledgeable friends, who also sent it out to a friend. One asked if I had a photo of the back of the bird, which I did, I always try to photograph the backs for possible sale to books for ID use. I sent that to them and they decided it was indeed a Scarlet Tanager, just with an interesting second wing band. I had mixed emotions about that identification. I thought it would be really cool to have a rare bird stop by, but then I thought about the movie “Field of Dreams” and the long lines of people coming to see the field. That is what a lot of birders will do when they learn of a rare sighting. I felt that would seriously cramp my morning routine…
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 2500, shutter speed of 1/125th of a second, Sirui P224S monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiImaging, #SiruiProfessional, #BirdNirdvana

Scarlet Tanager

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 25, 2018 by lilybug1960

Scarlet Tanager.
 
I will get a lot of folks that will look at this and say it can’t be a Scarlet Tanager, but it is! When these birds are in their breeding plumage, they are bright scarlet, and when they are in non-breeding plumage they are yellow. When they are molting and in between, well they can be both. Some breeding males will have both yellow and red, even a little orange, but in a few weeks this guy will be all yellow. He will make his flight to the south wearing his yellow travel suit! As you can see he has a mouthful of fat juicy insect. My natural pest control solution here in Bear Woods.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 1250, shutter speed of 1/160th of a second, Sirui P224S monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiImaging, #SiruiProfessional, #BirdNirdvana

Natural Insect Control

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2018 by lilybug1960

Natural Insect control.
 
Tonight I am doing lecture for the Griffin Chapter of the Georgia Nature Photographers Association on things we have done here in our yard that not only improves my photography but makes it a more natural order in life. I am doing a version of this lecture in Jackson, WY Sunday as well. It is titled “Avoiding a Silent Spring” and is how we have taken to heart some of the subjects that were talked about in Rachel Carson’s book “Silent Spring”. One of the points was how widespread we humans treated and still treat for Japanese Beetles. We treat the plants and soil with chemicals, but to no avail. Here in Bear Woods, we don’t treat with any chemicals, we use a product called Scarlet Tanager. The Tanagers love eating the beetles and I simply sit on the porch and photograph them as they come in for their meals. This will start to occur around the end of June, beginning of July and continue for a few weeks. We have slowly, 4 or 5 years, worked on returning many parts of our property to more natural settings and in doing so attracted a tremendous amount of migratory birds. My presentation talks about our efforts and how we have set up bird photography studios to capture the beauty of the visitors we have attracted. I will show lots of pretty pictures of the birds and help to give you ideas of how to do some simple common sense things to do the same, regardless of the size of your yard. It will be worth the time for you if you simply love seeing beautiful birds, photographing them, or just simply want to make your yard a safer, chemical free place to live.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 1000, shutter speed of 1/125th of a second, Sirui P424S monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional

Scarlet Tanager

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 6, 2018 by lilybug1960

Scarlet Tanager.
 
One of my favorite summer birds up here is the Scarlet Tanager. We have them nesting in the area and they visit the backyard often in spring, summer and fall. Part of our efforts to eliminate using pesticides has resulted in the return of so many birds to the yard. The Scarlet Tanagers come down to gorge themselves on Japanese Beetles each summer and I will see them grab a few bees near the hives as well. This image was made as I was waiting to get a few images of the female Blackburnian Warbler the other day. The Tanager flew in to check out my activities.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 640, shutter speed of 1/1000th of a second, Sirui N3204X tripod and PH20 Gimbal Head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional, #BirdNirdvana

Why being a Birder will improve your Nature Photography

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 7, 2018 by lilybug1960

Why Being a Birder will improve your Nature Photography.
 
Before I start I should also say it will improve your life as well. I was always interested in nature as a kid. I had field guides and spent every free minute wandering in the woods. My greater appreciation for birding took hold when I became a professional Nature Photographer. My mentor, John Shaw, didn’t accept my identification of a Herring Gull as a Seagull. He pushed me to learn the identifications of birds and their habits as well. In 1995 a trip to the Galapagos Islands for a workshop was a check mark off of my bucket list. Then later that month I attended the first NANPA Nature Photography Forum held in Ft. Myers, FL. During that event I was a co-leader on a trip to J. Ding Darling NWR and was lucky enough to be joined by Roger Tory Peterson. My birding took off like wildfire from that point. A few years later my wife Evelyn registered me for continuing education classes at Cornell Lab of Ornithology for a Christmas gift. During that time I found how much more I wanted to spend outside learning and observing birds and nature. In doing so, my exposure to sunrises and sunsets took new meanings in the respect that it became more than just light, it became an event to observe and learn. The more time I spent outside, the more I photographed, and my craft improved. It has changed how I do yard work even. Instead of pesticides, I let the Scarlet Tanagers glean Japanese Beetles from the trees and shrubs. In turn, I watch and photograph.
 
I will always consider myself a photography teacher, but it is such a great feeling when one of my fellow photographers express how my passion for birding has influenced them as well. It is a great feeling when someone captures an image of a bird and they want to learn what the bird is and ask questions of its behavior as well. Nothing bad comes of educating someone about the natural world. We all become better photographers, and better people as well. Learn that “bird” isn’t just a noun, it can be a verb as well.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 1000, shutter speed of 1/125th of a second, Sirui P424S carbon fiber monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional, #BirdNirdvana