Archive for Lightroom Classic CC

Ready to move in!

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 24, 2018 by lilybug1960

Ready to move in!
 
This pair of Eastern Bluebirds have claimed the Nestbox in the backyard and are starting to move in some furniture (grass and stems). All the other Bluebirds have moved on to their hopeful breeding territories and these two are my residents now. Spring is truly in the air.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 400, shutter speed of 1/125th of a second, Sirui P224S monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional, #BirdNirdvana
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Sad news from the Berry Nest

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 23, 2018 by lilybug1960

Sad News from the Berry Nest.
 
I don’t have a photo of the inside of the nest obviously, so I picked a photo of Ma Berry. Last night one of the eaglets from the Berry College nest got too close the edge of the nest and fell. After gaining permission, people from Berry went to the nest and found the eaglet on the ground, it did not survive the fall. It is very sad news whenever we lose one of the beautiful birds.
 
Eagles have about a 50% mortality rate during the first year for many reasons. There are many reasons they don’t survive, but this is the first time something has happened while the birds were in the nest. Sadly this is nature, raw nature that we are able to see day to day and minute to minute. I enjoy watching the nest to see how Eagles interact with each other. I am amazed at how gentle the adults can be with their young. There are a lot of folks who look beyond appreciating nature and become so involved in watching the nest(s) (there are many that stream video) that they are probably a little too involved in the cameras. A friend had notified me last night a little while after it happened and as I went to watch, I was amazed and appalled at how harsh and rude people were with each other over the incident. Honestly, there was nothing anyone could do to prevent or change the outcome, again it is nature. It is understandable to be sad, but folks should realize that along with the great things we are allowed to see, we will see some bad as well. People need to understand there is not a script, there isn’t always a happy outcome when viewing nature. I would caution people when they allow themselves to get so caught up with viewing.
 
That said, it will be interesting to see if beyond noticing last night the eaglet was gone if the adults search some this morning or today. We too often attach human emotions and reactions to the birds we watch. The Eagles don’t have the emotions we do and I think after watching for a little while last night, the adults continue realizing the loss and simply will care for the remaining eaglet. I’m not saying they don’t mourn, I don’t know, but I think they also realize this is nature better than humans do. So today I am saddened at the loss of a beautiful bird, but happy there is still an eaglet in the nest and hoping it makes it to its second year and beyond. My thoughts go out to those at Berry College who are dedicated to studying the nest.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-850, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 560, shutter speed of 1/1000th of a second, handheld utilizing the Vibration Compensation feature of the lens, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2018 by lilybug1960

Yellow-rumped Warbler.
 
Last year was an incredible year for me with all the Warblers in my yard (27 varieties), and I am hoping to beat that number this year. I would love to increase the number, not only in the yard, but in my image library this year. The year has started out nicely for me so far. While I was in Florida in January I was able to capture some nice images of Yellow-rumped and Palm Warblers. This Yellow-rumped Warbler, often referred to as “Butter-butt” because of the bright yellow area on the rump area of the bird, was enjoying a nice little meal of a damselfly at the Orlando Wetlands City Park. They are a common bird in many areas during the winter, but we don’t see them here in Bear Woods. It was nice to get a chance to photograph them in such a nice setting. Hopefully Bird Nirdvana 2018 will be a good one!
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 1600, shutter speed of 1/400th of a second, Sirui N3204x tripod and PH20 Gimbal head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional

Watering Can Wren

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 21, 2018 by lilybug1960

Watering Can Wren.
 
I posted an image the other day of the Carolina Wren that liked to build the nest inside the tin watering can. I also mentioned since the can sprung (southern for started leaking) a leak, I drilled a hole in the bottom and hung it on the wall. Within a short time the Wren started checking it out and bringing in nesting material. It has been a few days now and the nest is the typical shaped nest with a little tunnel that goes down into the bottom. They are bring in the carpet (moss) at this point and I think the move in will be complete soon and they will start laying eggs soon. On another note, a pair of Eastern Bluebirds have claimed the nestbox in the backyard and are hanging out on top, going inside, and even running other birds off from the area. With temperatures in the 70s already, the birds feel Spring has arrived.
 
Tamron 100-400mm Di VC USD lens on a Canon M6 mirrorless camera via the Canon adapter, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 1600, shutter speed of 1/80th of a second, Sirui P224S monopod and L10 head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional

“Yellow Slippers”

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2018 by lilybug1960

“Yellow Slippers”
 
When I first started birding and doing bird photography many years ago a friend pointed to a white wading bird and stated “yellow slippers” means it is a Snowy Egret. Birds tend to look very similar and can easily be confused. A Cattle Egret is similar in size and shape, but lack the yellow feet of the Snowy Egret among other things, but this one feature makes it easily distinguishable. That has stuck with me for all the years I have birded. We were lucky enough to see a small pond of mixed birds when we were at Merritt Island, among the birds were lots of Snowy Egrets. A beautiful and delicate bird in appearance.
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-850, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 1400, shutter speed of 1/1000th of a second, Sirui N3204x tripod and PH20 Gimbal Head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional

Photographing Birds of Prey Presentation Tonight

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Photography Workshops, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2018 by lilybug1960

Photographing Birds of Prey Presentation Tonight.
 
Tonight I will be doing a free and open to the public presentation for the North Georgia Photography Club in Dahlonega, GA starting at 6:30pm. The address is: 25 Schultz Ave, Dahlonega, GA 30533. I will talk about techniques and gear that I use to capture images of birds of prey and some suggestions on settings to help you as well. I promise to show lots of images of beautiful birds and share some of their stories as well. The best thing is it will be with lots of folks who share an interest in photography and birds of prey. When I started out in photography, there were few if any clubs for me or others to attend and learn from each other and speakers who would come in to present. The NGPC does lots of field trips with each other to share their knowledge and interest with each other as well. Come on out if you live nearby, meet some nice folks, see some pretty images, who knows, maybe you will learn something about photographing birds of prey as well!
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 180, shutter speed of 1/1000, Sirui N3204x tripod and PH20 Gimbal Head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional

Is this Owl defective?

Posted in Bird Photography, Equipment I Use, Favorite Places, Random Thoughts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 15, 2018 by lilybug1960

Is this Owl defective?
 
When you look at an Burrowing Owl that is facing away from you and all of a sudden it rotates its head 180 degrees, it is pretty weird at first. I wanted to capture an image of one in this position so it looked like it had been “assembled” wrong at the Owl factory. Owls eyes don’t move in their head and are always stationary, so in order to see to the side or behind them without rotating their body, they can rotate their heads about 270 degrees and not tear any tendons or blood vessels. Another interesting fact about the Burrowing Owl is its ability to live in an area where there is higher levels of carbon monoxide, such as an underground burrow. Please keep in mind this would be slightly elevated and is how the owl is able to spend so many hours underground. They are also great rodent hunters, often hunting them while running on the ground vs swooping down and grabbing them from flight. They are really just cool birds!
 
Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD G2 lens on a Nikon D-850, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 500, shutter speed of 1/500th of a second, Sirui N3204X tripod and PH20 Gimbal Head, processed in Lightroom Classic CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronUSA, #TamronLensesUSA, #TamronImageMaster, #Sirui, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiProfessional