Photographing in Extreme Cold

snake-river-overlook-011317a-copy

Photographing in Extreme Cold.
 
I have been wanting to post about our experiences in the Grand Tetons and the effects of the cold temps on our gear. First, the gear wasn’t the biggest issue, it was wearing enough clothing in the right places to work comfortably in the cold. Most folks had issues with cold fingers, toes and their faces. This not only made operating the camera difficult, but it made thinking about things became distractions from the scene and settings. I typically wear a thin glove liner with a fleece glove on top of it. That way it allows me to set up the camera and when necessary make changes quickly by removing the out glove on my right hand. Wearing a good warm hat that covers your head and ears is the answer for your face as well. Finding the right set of boots is the answer for your feet. I wore snow boots with a wool sock underneath and still got a chill in my toes. I am going to look at better boots before the next trip.
 
As for my camera, I had no issues. A few folks suffered quick battery power loss. I kept my camera under my jacket, but away from my body, between shooting sets. I carried several extra batteries, freshly charged, in my pocket close to my body heat to keep them warm and ready. One person did have an issue where their camera locked up, but it may or may not have been from the cold. We simply reset it later at the ranch and it was fine. Tripods seemed to work fine. I did find that people with twist locks had less issues adjusting their tripods than flip locks. Adjusting the ballhead was one noticeable chore. The cold temps made the ballhead stiff but all was fine. Any type of grease or lubricant gets very stiff, but returned to normal once we got into warm temperatures again. All in all, everything worked great. The people felt the effects more so than the gear.
 
Tamron 16-300mm Di-II VC PZD lens on a Nikon D-500, Manual Exposure mode, f8, ISO 100, shutter speed 1/15th of a second, Sirui W2204X waterproof tripod and K20X ballhead, processed in Lightroom CC. #WithMyTamron, #TamronImageMasters, #SiruiUSA, #SiruiPro
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: